By Hawaii Dermatology & Surgery Inc.
May 15, 2017
Category: Skin Conditions
Tags: Eczema  

EczemaEczema, also called “dermatitis,” refers to several different rash-like conditions where the skin is inflamed, red and irritated. The most severe and long-lasting type of eczema is atopic dermatitis. During a flare-up, the skin becomes extremely red, itchy and scaly. This skin condition can be widespread, or confined to only a few areas on the body.

Eczema is not contagious, although if you have a family history of eczema, your risk for the disease increases. Generally, atopic dermatitis affects infants or young children and may last until the child reaches adulthood.

The appearance and symptoms for atopic dermatitis will vary for each case. Intense itching is the most common sign of eczema, which can lead to severe discomfort and even loss of sleep. Other common symptoms of eczema include:

  • Dry, red and extremely itchy patches of skin
  • Cracked, inflamed and scaly skin
  • Small bumps or blisters that ooze and weep
  • In infants, the rash generally appears on the cheeks and around the mouth

Eczema outbreaks are caused by an overreaction of your skin’s immune system to environmental and emotional triggers, such as temperature, chemicals, dust, mold or stress. While there is currently no cure, eczema sufferers can practice self-care at home to help reduce flare-ups. Lifestyle adjustments are the best line of defense in controlling all types of eczema. Goals of treatment include reducing inflammation, decreasing risk of infection and alleviating the itch. To minimize symptoms and outbreaks:

  • Moisturize every day to prevent dryness and cracking.
  • Limit contact with irritants, such as soaps, clothing, jewelry, foods and detergents.
  • Avoid sudden changes in temperatures as overheating and sweating are common triggers of flare-ups.
  • Reduce stress and anxiety.
  • Minimize exposure to mold, pollens and animal dander.
  • Opt for cotton, loose-fitting clothes and avoid wool and other rough materials.

Treatment for eczema begins with a proper diagnosis from your dermatologist. If you are diagnosed with eczema, your dermatologist can explain your type of eczema and can work with you to tailor a treatment plan that meets your individual needs to effectively manage the symptoms.

By Hawaii Dermatology & Surgery Inc.
May 02, 2017
Category: Skin Care
Tags: Melanoma  

MelanomaMelanoma is the deadliest form of skin cancer. Fortunately, it rarely develops without warning, and the number of fatalities caused by melanoma could be greatly reduced if people were aware of the early signs and took time to examine their skin. With early diagnosis and treatment, your chance of recovery from melanoma is very good.   

What Causes Melanoma?

The main cause of melanoma is too much skin exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. UV rays from the sun and tanning booths can damage skin cells, causing the cells to grow abnormally. The best way to prevent melanoma is to reduce the amount of time you spend in the sun, wearing hats and protective clothing when possible and generously applying sunscreen.

Melanoma can occur anywhere on the body, including the soles of your feet or your fingernails. In women, melanoma is most often seen on the lower legs, and in men, it most commonly forms on the upper back.

Anyone can get melanoma, but people with the following traits are at a higher risk:

  • Fair skin
  • Excessive sun exposure during childhood
  • Family history of melanoma
  • More than 50 moles on the skin
  • Several freckles
  • Sun-sensitive skin that rarely tans or burns easily

Melanoma can appear suddenly as a new mole, or it can grow slowly, near or in an existing mole. The most common early signs of melanoma are:

  • An open sore that repeatedly heals and re-opens
  • A mole or growth that takes on an uneven shape, grows larger or changes in color or texture
  • An existing mole that continues to bleed, itch, hurt, scab or fade

Because melanoma can spread quickly to other parts of the body, it is important to find melanoma as early as possible. The best way to detect changes in your moles and skin markings is by doing self-examinations regularly. If you find suspicious moles, have them checked by your dermatologist.

Visiting your dermatologist for a routine exam is also important. During this skin cancer "screening," your dermatologist will discuss your medical history and inspect your skin from head to toe, recording the location, size and color of any moles. Melanoma may be the most serious form of skin cancer, but it is also very curable when detected early.

By Hawaii Dermatology & Surgery Inc.
April 17, 2017
Category: Skin Care
Tags: Wrinkles  

The telltale signs of aging skin—wrinkles, puffy eyes, age spots—may start to appear as we grow older. We can’t fight the aging process, but we wrinklescan take steps now to help reduce and prevent wrinkles from appearing prematurely.  

Many factors can contribute to the onset of wrinkles, which are frequently produced by years of unprotected sun exposure in combination with each person’s unique genetic predisposition. Wrinkles are a by-product of the aging process. As we age, our skin loses its elasticity, is less capable of retaining moisture and is slower to heal.  All of these contribute to the development of wrinkles and sagging skin.

How Can I Slow the Progression of Wrinkles?

Daily skincare and proper sun protection are important factors in slowing the aging process, diminishing fine lines and minimizing wrinkles.   

  • Take your vitamins.  Many vitamins are good for the skin. Vitamin C, a natural antioxidant found in citrus fruits and dark green leafy vegetables, can help reduce the appearance of sun damage.
  • Apply sunscreen.  Protecting yourself from sun exposure can help prevent the progression of fine lines. The American Academy of Dermatology recommends applying a sunscreen with a SPF of at least 30 to protect against harmful UV rays.  
  • Moisturize.  Dry skin causes the skin to look dull and aged. To prevent dry skin, apply moisturizer every day.   
  • Get your beauty sleep.  When your body doesn’t get enough sleep, it produces excess cortisol, a hormone that breaks down skin cells. Keep your skin looking and feeling young by getting at least seven hours of sleep every night.
  • Avoid tanning beds. Tanning beds emit harmful UVA rays and are never 'safe' alternatives to the sun.
  • Take care of your hands. Our hands are often the first part of our body to reveal signs of aging, as they are the most used and exposed parts of the body. Protect the hands by wearing gloves, moisturizing and applying sunscreen.
  • Quit smoking.  Smoking may damage more than your lungs—it causes skin aging and wrinkles around the mouth.

Like it or not, wrinkles are a natural part of aging. Even the most diligent skincare regimen or the most expensive wrinkle cream won’t totally eliminate your fine lines. You can significantly reduce the appearance of your wrinkles, however. Start taking care of your skin now, embrace your age and love the skin you’re in!

By Hawaii Dermatology & Surgery Inc.
March 30, 2017
Category: Skin Condition
Tags: Acne  

Teenage AcneAcne is by far the most common skin complaint among teenagers, affecting nearly all of those between the ages of 12 and 17 at least occasionally, according to the American Academy of Dermatology. In most cases, hormones released during puberty are responsible for the appearance of blemishes during the teen years. These hormones stimulate the skin's sebaceous (oil) glands, producing oily skin that is more prone to breakouts. Because teens are extremely conscious of their image and appearance, an acne outbreak can be emotionally devastating.

While hormonal changes during puberty cause many types of acne to be unavoidable, with a diligent skincare regimen, many teens can help control breakouts from becoming severe, minimize the appearance of blemishes and prevent scarring.

  • Keep skin clean. Teens produce more oil, so it's important to wash your face every day with warm water and a mild cleanser to remove excess surface oils and dead skin cells. Always remove makeup before going to bed to avoid clogging pores.
  • Avoid over washing. Harsh scrubbing can lead to dry, irritated skin, which can actually increase inflammation and trigger glands to produce more oil.
  • Don't pick. Squeezing and picking at acne can make breakouts worse. Picking at blemishes can also lead to greater inflammation and infection, increasing the risk for scarring.
  • Keep hands off. Avoid touching your face throughout the day, as your hands carry bacteria.
  • Use oil-free products. Avoid oil-based makeup. Instead, look for products that are noncomedogenic or non-acnegenic.
  • Shower after sports or physical activities. Sweat and oil can settle on the skin's surface, trapping dirt and bacteria in the pores.
  • Visit your dermatologist. Most cases of mild acne can be controlled and improved with a good skincare routine at home. If your skin problems persist, visit your dermatologist for professional treatment.

Being a teenager is tough enough without having to worry about breakouts. The good news is that effective treatments are available for acne - and the earlier treatment is started, the lower a teen's risk of lasting physical and emotional damage. When home care is not helping, talk to a dermatologist about treatment options. Your dermatologist can help tailor a treatment plan that is best for a teen's unique skin type and needs.

By Hawaii Dermatology & Surgery Inc.
March 14, 2017
Category: Skin Condition
Tags: Adult Acne  

adult acneAcne is the most common of all skin disorders, affecting almost everyone at some point in their lives. While most people outgrow acne in their late teens or early twenties, many are affected into adulthood or even experience late onset acne. Although the exact cause of adult acne is unknown, possible causes include stress, cosmetics and hormones.

How Can I Treat Adult Acne?

Not only is chronic adult acne frustrating, but it can also have long-lasting effects on the self-esteem and confidence of those suffering from it. To combat blemishes, follow a few basic guidelines to improve your skin's condition.

  • Avoid the urge to pick or squeeze pimples. Aggravating your acne will only increase inflammation, delay the healing process and lead to scarring.
  • Follow a daily skincare regimen to remove oils, make up, and sweat from the surface of your skin.
  • When wearing make-up, only use oil-free cosmetics.
  • Avoid over-washing your skin, as this can make your acne worse.
  • Wash gently with a mild facial cleanser once or twice a day. Be cautious of harsh cleansing products that lead to dry, irritated skin.
  • Eat a well-balanced diet.
  • Limit exposure to sun and excess cold.

Fortunately, the physical and emotional effects of acne can be reversed with proper treatment. While adult acne can be persistent, an individualized treatment plan from our office can help you reduce blemishes, prevent scarring and eliminate your acne. With diligent home care and help from your dermatologist, your acne can be significantly improved, allowing you to regain your confidence!





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